A “Halftone Edge” style for QGIS

I added a new “Halftone Edge” style for QGIS to my GitLab repository that contains some of my use cases of Geometry Generators.

All info on this new QGIS style, including example files, can be found on https://gitlab.com/GIS-projects/qgis-geometry-generator-examples/tree/master/QML-files/halftone_edge.

You can download the entire repository with all my Geometry Generator examples at once: https://gitlab.com/GIS-projects/qgis-geometry-generator-examples/-/archive/master/qgis-geometry-generator-examples-master.zip

Copy WFS data to PostGIS using ogr2ogr (PART 3): automating the import procedure

Sometimes a web service you use in your GIS application is offline and that results in a GIS application that doesn’t work as it should or doesn’t show the correct data. To avoid these problems you should have a local copy of the data of that web service. For a WFS service the data can be copied to a PostGIS database. This can be done using the command line utility ogr2ogr. This isn’t too hard but some people might be afraid to use the command line. So I wrote this guide about how to handle this from installation to automating the import procedure. Because this guide became pretty long, I divided it up into 3 parts. Part 1 was about the installation of GDAL and ogr2ogr. Part 2 was about the use of ogr2ogr in a Windows batch file and part 3 is about automating the import procedure.

Continue reading “Copy WFS data to PostGIS using ogr2ogr (PART 3): automating the import procedure”

Copy WFS data to PostGIS using ogr2ogr (PART 2): use ogr2ogr in a batch file

Sometimes a web service you use in your GIS application is offline and that results in a GIS application that doesn’t work as it should or doesn’t show the correct data. To avoid these problems you should have a local copy of the data of that web service. For a WFS service the data can be copied to a PostGIS database. This can be done using the command line utility ogr2ogr. This isn’t too hard but some people might be afraid to use the command line. So I wrote this guide about how to handle this from installation to automating the import procedure. Because this guide became pretty long I divided it up into 3 parts. Part 1 was about the installation of GDAL and ogr2ogr. Part 2 is about the use of ogr2ogr in a Windows batch file and part 3 will be about automating the import procedure.

Continue reading “Copy WFS data to PostGIS using ogr2ogr (PART 2): use ogr2ogr in a batch file”

A gauges style for QGIS

Gauges style in QGIS

I added a new “Gauges” style for QGIS to my GitLab repository that contains some of my use cases of Geometry Generators.

All info on this new QGIS style, including example files, can be found on https://gitlab.com/GIS-projects/qgis-geometry-generator-examples/tree/master/QML-files/gauges

You can download the entire repository with all my Geometry Generator examples at once: https://gitlab.com/GIS-projects/qgis-geometry-generator-examples/-/archive/master/qgis-geometry-generator-examples-master.zip

Version 2.0.1 of ZoomToBelgium for QGIS released

Last week I released a new version of my QGIS plugin ZoomToBelgium. This plugin helps you to zoom to one of the administrative boundaries in Belgium with one click on a button. In the front end of the plugin you probably won’t notice many differences with version 1.x of the plugin, but in the back end the plugin was updated to make it easier to maintain. This new version is only available for QGIS 3.x. QGIS 2 is no longer supported.

Continue reading “Version 2.0.1 of ZoomToBelgium for QGIS released”

Convert a points layer to a polygons layer in QGIS without using plugins

In QGIS it’s possible to convert a points layer to a polygons layer in just a few steps. To do so there are some minimum requirements for the points layer, because QGIS has to know which points should be grouped to a polygon and in which order these points must form a polygon. To illustrate this I have created a test layer with 7 points. I added two new fields: “polygon” and “order”. The field “polygon” indicates which points have to form a polygon together. In this example the result should be two polygons (1 & 2). The field “order” indicates in which order the points should be connected to form a polygon. In this example the result will be a triangle and a quadrangle (quadrilateral).

Continue reading “Convert a points layer to a polygons layer in QGIS without using plugins”